Home > News > Skyscraper News > London > United Kingdom > Ballymore Brings The Big Apple To London

Ballymore Brings The Big Apple To London

2012 should have been the year that Stratford, boosted by Olympic legacy hit a critical mass but the success story of the year has been Nine Elms, an area which has seen proposal after proposal blossom.

One of these is Embassy Gardens, a two-phase project by Ballymore that involves the construction of a number of residential buildings on two sites, one to the west of the approved American embassy and the other to the south. Phase one is being built on the west just on the road from St James Thames-side development, Silverlight.

Leading the marketing charge for Ballymore is the Capital Building, a residential structure split into two cores of 16 and 13 floors respectively. As one might expect from the name, the architecture riffs off New York with a design highly influenced by the brick warehouses of the Big Apple's meat-packing district. It's a joint design from Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, Arup and Terry Farrell.

Residents of the scheme will be able to enjoy a luxurious club on the lower floors of the building. Entered through a grand lobby with interior design by Woods Bagot, there will be a cinema, café/bar, a library and lounge, a business centre and a restaurant. The mezzanine level has a fully equipped gymnasium, yoga studio, changing rooms, and a boxing ring that could come in useful for settling neighbourly disagreements. To rest from a bruising punch-up, the third level of the residents facilities will have steam rooms, treatment rooms, an indoor lap pool and an outdoor hydro pool.

The development will overlook the planned linear park that will cut a green swathe through the Nine Elms Opportunity Area, whilst the Capital Building will also front on to a new public plaza named New Union Square that has been landscaped by Camlins. It is almost new New York and clearly aimed at the American community drawn towards their new embassy.

The Capital Building should start rising next year.

Article Related buildings:

Capital Building Core A

Capital Building Core A
Capital Building Core B

Capital Building Core B
Capital Building, London
Capital Building, London