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MAKE Design Huge Half Donut In The City

Just when you thought architecture firm, MAKE, couldn't come up with anything more outlandish than the likes of the Cube, Vortex and Kite Tower they do it again, this time in the heart of London on a project called 30 The Old Bailey.

The curvaceous scheme being developed by Land Securities features two buildings, one occupying the north section of the site and the other occupying the southern area that together will cover a whole city block. This area currently has on it Export House, Seacoal House, and Hillgate House.

The North building will have 27,170 square metres of office space and the South will have 17,262 square metres representing a total uplift in available space for the site of 12,530 square metres on what is currently being offered. They will both be a maximum of nine storeys and a total of 41.72 metres tall above ground level which is less than the highest current building on the plot.

The ground floor of the South building is dominated by retail outlets looking onto Ludgate. There will be a whole 5 car parking spaces, 65 spaces for motorbikes and 214 cycle spaces.

At the heart of it all bounding on to Old Bailey is the central courtyard that gives the impression of the scheme being half a donut thanks to the hole in the middle or alternatively a vortex in the eye of the storm. Overlooking the rear of this space will be a triple height café on the ground floor with a large mezzanine area.

Moving north-west from the main public space will be a covered 6 metre wide pedestrian route linking Old Bailey with Limeburner Lane and physically separating the North and South buildings.

30 The Old Bailey will be clad in a specially designed tilted façade that reduces solar gain as much as possible. The outside will be covered in a chequerboard type pattern whilst the inner court will be diamondesque rising out from within and wrapping itself over the roof of both buildings.

One of the big challenges was the issue of incorporating an existing EDF electricity substation into the design. Temporary trusses will be built over the substation allowing the contractors to build floors above it. Once construction is finished these will be removed and the new emergency cores with bracing that lay to the sides of it will provide support instead.

Another of the tests faced by MAKE was the sight-lines for St Paul's Cathedral. The viewing grid actually cuts through the portion of the South building that faces on to Ludgate Hill with allowed heights being a mere 32.5 metres AOD. MAKE responded to this by effectively taking the entire area of the plot that has the viewing line cutting through it and slicing it out of the building creating a large roof terrace for the occupiers.

As a result the plans confirm strongly with all the heritage requirements plus the existing UDP of the City of London from the provision of retail, to the discouraging use of the motorcar and integration of existing utilities into the design. It should breeze through planning as there's likely to be few complaints for something that complies so strictly with all the requirements.

Article Related buildings:

30 Old Bailey North

30 Old Bailey North
30 Old Bailey South

30 Old Bailey South
Kite Tower

Kite Tower
30 Old Bailey London
30 Old Bailey London
30 Old Bailey London
30 Old Bailey London