Home > News > Skyscraper News > London > United Kingdom > Three Sisters Proposed for Waterloo

Three Sisters Proposed for Waterloo

Allies and Morrison have won the competition held by P&O Estates, the property wing of the shipping company, for the redevelopment of their Elizabeth House site adjacent to the Shell Centre on the Southbank in London that is bordered by York Road.

The site is currently occupied by the Tower Building, a sixties mid-rise international block and has previously been the subject of a proposal for a tower by RHWL Architects that was dumped after much criticism by planning bodies at the integration of it into ground level thanks to the island the site is on surrounded by traffic and the complex pedestrian access to it.

The winner features a flank of three towers stretching along the site in height from east to west reaching about 140 metres in total creating the appearance of a randomly angled cluster. Detailed design work is now to commence at once on what the p.rs are already hopefully dubbing "the three sisters".

The competition has been hard fought over with the other finalists including a half sphere mimicking the London Eye that was designed Make, a single twisting tower with lower rise podium drawn up by KPF and something appearing an angular egg timer worked on by Foreign Office Architects.

Although only at the early stages of planning the Allies and Morrison winner is certain to receive much criticism thanks to the prominence of the site, not to mention the danger the massing images show of creating a wall of buildings along this area of the Southbank that completely dominate the view and take attention away from the delicateness of the London Eye that is bound to raise strong local objections.

Following the planning text book to the dot the area has however been identified by the London authorities as part of the "Waterloo Opportunity Area" thanks to the close proximity it has to a major transport exchange. They hope that 15,000 new jobs and 500 homes can be created, aspirations that have existed since London Mayor Ken Livingstone first talked of the potential of the site for tall buildings and high density development back in 2000.

Despite this high level support though, the developer and architect will have to win over the local borough planners of Lambeth Council who are not the biggest fan of high-rise buildings and face an uphill struggle unless they manage to overcome the ground level problems that scuppered the original Elizabeth House scheme by making an original and ingenious contribution to the ground level public realm whilst maintaining the commercial need for large floor plates on what is a difficult site.

Article Related buildings:

Elizabeth House

Elizabeth House
The Tower Building

The Tower Building
Upstream Building

Upstream Building
Elizabeth House Waterloo
Elizabeth House Waterloo